How to Make a Workshop in a Garage

Video Transcript

Video Transcript

RON HAZELTON:
You know, when I set this shop up a couple of years ago, I gave some thought to organization, but not a whole lot. Now that I've had a chance to use it for a while so I decided it's time for a shop makeover. For one thing, I've accumulated a lot of materials and small parts and I often have trouble putting my hands on what I want.

So I'm going to dedicate this wall back here to organization, so I can find what I want when I want it. Now over here, well, the organization's not too bad, but things like this, I kind of want out of sight, behind doors.

So I'm going to go for a cleaner, more contemporary look. Well, the first thing of course though is, out with the old.
[SHOT OF CLEANING OUT]
Well it's kind of like a blank canvas, isn't it? Now I've been thinking about I want to do here and I've made up a sketch. Down here on the bottom, I'm going to put a run of base cabinets. Some of them will have doors and some drawers.

Then on top of that, a nice heavy countertop. Probably something wood. And then up here, some wall cabinets, we'll have doors on those, and then I'm going to leave space in between for the tool board. Now these are the cabinets that I'm going to be using for this wall over here.

They're from Stanley and they're designed specifically for basement garage and workshop storage. What I like about them is that they're strong, yet lightweight. And they hang very easily using a series of these clips. I'll mount these on the wall in a level line and then, all I have to do is hang the cabinet on the clip. Now this is the height at which I want to mount this row of clips and the easiest way for me to get a level line all the way down the wall is with this laser level.

This is actually called an air grip from Ryobi[?]  and it's got a little on board vacuum pump, so all I have to do is align this with that mark, rotate the head here until the level, the bubble on the level falls between the two lines here, and now I've got a perfectly straight and level line all the way down the wall.

With the clips attached to the wall, all I have to do is hang the cabinets in place. Now it doesn't get much easier than this. And it's the kind of design I really appreciate, especially when I'm working by myself.

A couple of screws inside lock the cabinets in place. Additional clips provide even more capacity and prevent the bottom from pulling away from the wall.  The base cabinets go in just as easily. I check for level as I go and make any necessary adjustments by screwing the leg bottoms up or down.

Pretty nice, huh?  Now I'm going to splurge a little bit on the counter top and install this inch and a half thick solid hardwood. I think it's going to contrast very nicely with this more contemporary look over here.

Now on this wall, I've got plenty of counter space and great storage for my tools. Over here, I'm going for something different. Here, I want storage for small parts and materials and this is what I've come up with. A series of shelves on which I'm going to put plastic boxes and bins of all sorts. Now the key for me right here is flexibility and adaptability and I think I've found just the system that will give me that.

The shelving I'm going to install requires that I start by drawing a level line near the top of the wall. Here, too, the self-attaching laser level seems like the ideal tool for the job. The next step though is a bit awkward, to say the least.

You know, I'm often working by myself like this and it can really be a struggle trying to hold one piece up with your hand while you're getting a screw started with the other. So here's a way to give yourself an extra pair of hands.
[SOUND CUT]
The solution is really quite simple. I just drive a finish nail into the wall and set one end of my work piece on top. Now I can easily hold the opposite end with one hand while leaving my other hand free to use the driver. Now this is the max load shelving system from Closet Maid and the reason it's so flexible is that the entire system hangs from this rail right here.

Once it's up, I just hook the ends of the standards over the bottom edge and slide them into the best positions. Shelf supports then clip into the standards. Next, I set the shelves on the supports, gage the hooks at the rear, and lock them in position.

Once the shelves are in place, I install a couple of screws in each standard to keep them from moving side to side. With this system, I can also hang cabinets on the same standards used for the shelving. Now this is especially useful here, since this concrete footing would prevent me from pushing freestanding cabinets up against the wall.

The righthand cabinet has drawers … the left … shelving and doors. This system comes with a pre-finished counter that rests on top.  On the shelves I’m putting plastic parts bins.

Strips of one by two will create a space behind the pegboard that will allow the pegs to grip the on the backside. The pegboard itself is a new product with a surface that has a titanium --carbon fiber look.   Drywall screws attach the board to the one by two’s and  blend in so well, they are barely visible.

These plastic toolholders lock in place with a push of this screw head.  They won’t pull out when tools are removed or replaced and come in a variety of shapes for everything from pliers … to drills.
Ok, now I know what you’re thinking, it’s too good looking to be practical right?  Well the fact is I got almost everything that I wanted. Over here, I’ve got plenty of storage for all those materials in these bins and in these pull out cases down here.  I’ve also got doors and drawers below.  Over on this side, a great pegboard, tools are out in the open where I can see them and remember how messy these shelves were?  Well now everything is behind doors up here and I put a lot of it in these pull out bins.  And down here, underneath the bench top, plenty of additional storage behind all these doors and drawers.  Well, as they say, a place for everything and everything in its place.  It’s time for me now to get to work.

Convert Your Garage into the Ideal DIY Workshop with a Place for Everything and Everything in Its Place

Turn a garage into a functional and good-looking DIY workshop by first clearing the garage completely. Like a clean canvas, an empty garage lets you plan what you need rather than planning around the clutter. Lay out cabinets, counters, shelves, drawers, pegboards and bins for a workshop with a place for everything and then put everything in its place.

Remove Existing Tools and Materials from the Garage
Step 1

Remove Existing Tools and Materials from the Garage

Clear everything from the garage, sorting items to be discarded from those to keep. An empty garage lets you plan what you really need rather than adapting to the clutter. Have a yard sale with the discards and recycle properly.

Sketch a Layout for the First Garage Workshop Wall
Step 2

Sketch a Layout for the First Garage Workshop Wall

Plan one wall with base cabinets with doors and drawers, a heavy wooden countertop, space for a tool board and wall cabinets with doors. Storage in drawers and behind doors helps to hide objects that make a workshop appear disorganized.

Mount Wall Cabinets with Special Clips and a Laser Level
Step 3

Mount Wall Cabinets with Special Clips and a Laser Level

Use strong, lightweight wall cabinets designed for basements, garages and workshop storage. Sight a laser level at the correct elevation and attach special cabinet clips, securing them with screws driven through the cabinets and walls into the studs behind.

Position and Level Base Cabinets According to the Layout
Step 4

Position and Level Base Cabinets According to the Layout

Roll the base cabinets for the garage workshop into position along the first wall. Ensure their surfaces are level and even by adjusting the levelers on the bottom of each leg. The countertop requires a uniform surface across the cabinets.

Set a Heavy Hardwood Countertop over the Base Cabinets
Step 5

Set a Heavy Hardwood Countertop over the Base Cabinets

Use 1 1/2-inch thick solid hardwood for the counter top. If it is heavy enough and does not overhang the cabinets, it may not need to be secured.

Plan the Second Wall shelves, Bins, and Pegboards
Step 6

Plan the Second Wall shelves, Bins, and Pegboards

Layout storage areas on the second wall with shelves and plastic bins for small parts and materials, pegboard and base cabinets. This system comes with a pre-finished counter that rests on top.

Level and Mount the Rail for the Hanging Shelves
Step 7

Level and Mount the Rail for the Hanging Shelves

Draw a level pencil line near the top of the wall. Drive a temporary finishing nail into the wall to support one end of the cumbersome rail while you use a power drive to secure the other end with a screw.

Attach Shelf Standards and Supports to the Mounted Rail
Step 8

Attach Shelf Standards and Supports to the Mounted Rail

Use a shelving system that hangs from this rail, hooking the vertical standards over the bottom edge of the rail and inserting the shelf supports that lock into position. Add shelves that snap into the supports and secure with screws.

Position and Hang Cabinets on the Standards
Step 9

Position and Hang Cabinets on the Standards

Insert the grips on the back of the hanging cabinets into the standards in the same way as the shelf supports. These cabinets are suspended above the floor to avoid obstacles such as the concrete footing in this garage workshop.

Mount One-by-two Strips for Pegboard
Step 10

Mount One-by-two Strips for Pegboard

Add one-by-two strips and mount pegboard with drywall screws that blend invisibly on its titanium/carbon fiber-like finish. Insert plastic tool holders in a variety of convenient configurations and push the plastic screw heads to lock them in place.