How to Use a Waterproofer for Exterior Surfaces

Video Transcript

Video Transcript

RON HAZELTON:
When it comes to weatherproofing or waterproofing outdoor surfaces, well, most often we think of wood, but there are other materials that would also benefit from the right kind of waterproofing.

Concrete birdbaths, planters and lawn ornaments, for example, are porous and can absorb water. In some cases, this moisture can freeze, expand and cause cracking. A multisurface waterproofer like this can prevent that kind of damage.

For larger areas, the easiest way to apply it is with a garden-type sprayer. Pour it in, pump up the pressure and apply. It's important to avoid puddling and pooling. A thin, even coat works best. Keep the spray nozzle about 12 inches from the surface and move back and forth in smooth strokes.


The waterproofer dries fairly quickly. After about 48 hours, perform a splash test to determine if another coat is required. If the water beads up like this, the surface has adequate protection. Terracotta or clay pots are also very porous and can be easily damaged by freezing.

For small pieces like these, the waterproofer comes in a convenient aerosol can. Just shake and spray. Again, the splash test shows the result. The outdoor waterproofer can be used on other materials as well. Smaller wooden objects like this birdhouse can be easily and quickly treated with the aerosol can.

The cedar will protect the wood, but allow it to age naturally. If you're a hiker, camper or boater, you can waterproof maps and charts with the same aerosol sealer. Just lay the article flat and apply an even coating to one or both sides.


When dry, water will run off without penetrating while the chart or map will remain flexible.

So when it comes to protecting concrete, brick, terra cotta, maps, birdhouses or just about anything else from outdoor moisture, well waterproof protection is just a spray away.

Seal Porous Outdoor Objects with Multi-surface Waterproofer to Prevent Water Absorption and Related Damage Such as Freezing and Cracking

Protect porous outdoor objects from absorbing water to preserve their appearance and help stop them from freezing and cracking during the winter. Apply multi-surface waterproofer with a spray to concrete birdbaths, terracotta pots, wooden bird houses and feeders, and paper maps. Let the treated surface dry for 48 hours and know they're sealed when the water beads on the surface.

Apply Multi-Surface Waterproofer to Large Areas with a Garden Sprayer
Step 1

Apply Multi-Surface Waterproofer to Large Areas with a Garden Sprayer

Spray large areas, such as a concrete birdbath, with multi-surface waterproofer from a garden sprayer. Pour the solution in, pump it up, and spray about 12 inches from the surface in even strokes to avoid pooling. Cover the work surface.

Dry for 48 Hours and Perform a Splash Test
Step 2

Dry for 48 Hours and Perform a Splash Test

Let the treated surface dry for 48 hours. Splash a limited amount of water onto determine if it beads and demonstrate that the surface is sealed. If not, another coat is required.

Spray Smaller Surfaces with Multi-surface Waterproofer from a Can
Step 3

Spray Smaller Surfaces with Multi-surface Waterproofer from a Can

Protect smaller surfaces such as terracotta or other porous clay pots with multi-surface waterproofer in a convenient aerosol can.

Use the Outdoor Multi-surface Waterproofer on Wooden Objects
Step 4

Use the Outdoor Multi-surface Waterproofer on Wooden Objects

Protect wooden objects such as birdhouses with the multi-surface waterproofer applied from an aerosol can. For a cedar bird feeder, the treatment protects the surface while letting the wood beneath age naturally.

Waterproof Maps and Charts with Multi-surface Waterproofer
Step 5

Waterproof Maps and Charts with Multi-surface Waterproofer

Waterproof maps and charts to protect them from the elements as you boat, camp, or hike. Lay the article out flat and coat one or both sides. On drying, the paper remains flexible but sheds water like a duck's back.