Tools & Know-How/ Savers/ Parts of the House/ Doors/ Windows/ Exterior Windows/

Remove and Repair a Broken Glass Window Pane

Transcript

Learn how to replace a broken window pane; includes details on removing broken glass, cutting glass, using glaziers points and glazing.

Most single pane window glass is held in place with glazier’s putty and, oftentimes, small metal clips called glazier’s push points. Perhaps the most challenging part of this job is removing the old putty which, can, at times, be quite hard. In this video I show you how to cut your own glass to size, however, you can also get many hardware stores and home improvement centers to cut it for you. Always order the glass cut slightly small than the opening.  

Glazier’s window putty can be quite sticky stuff. Kneading it in your hand and rolling in into a coil before applying it can make it a bit more obedient. Smoothing the putty after putting it in place is really a matter of practice. If it’s not turning out as neatly as you’d like, scrape it out and try again. It’s really a matter of holding the putty knife at the right angle and applying even pressure.

Ron Hazelton Headshot

Have your project done by a local, qualified professional.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE QUOTE

Not everyone is in a position to do a project themselves. That's why I've partnered with HomeAdvisor.com to provide you with free quotes from qualified local professionals.

comments

Related Tips

Blog Articles

April 14, 2021

Foam Tiles Offer a Beautiful Way to Cover Up Out of Style Popcorn Ceilings

Outdated popcorn ceilings can be easily hidden beneath decorative foam ceiling tiles.

March 15, 2021

Refinish Your Cabinets - No Stripping!

If the kitchen is the most-used room in the house, then you can probably say that the kitchen cabinet is the most-used thing in that room. With time and repeated cleanings, they can end up looking pretty shabby. Here is an easy way to refinish your cabinets. 

March 15, 2021

Create Slide Out Shelves

Ready to organize your kitchen? Install sliding-shelf kits that you purchase, cut to size, and install in your kitchen cabinets for extra storage and easy access to items at the back. The kits join with dove-tailed sides and a tray bottom that is secured with screws.

Recent Articles